Imagining the human rights of the future

FIDH 100 years anniversary: Academic lecture series from 20 May to 8 December 2022

"Imagining the human rights of the future" From 11 May to 10 December 2022, FIDH is organising a series of lectures about the question : "Can the law save humanity, by protecting the climate and eradicating poverty?" It is with the forcefulness of this question asked by Diane Roman in her latest book ("La cause des droits, Ecologie, progrès social et droits humains", Dalloz, 2022) that we are organising this lectures series in honour of FIDH's centenary. Thanks to the analysis of renowned academics, FIDH's expertise, and the experience of people around the world who think, fight and, together, reinvent human rights, we invite you to follow the discussions online or in person. Lectures will be held in French.

conferences  2022
  • 30.03 17:30
    Centre Malher / University Paris 1 Panthéon Sorbonne
    Thumbnail of Right to exile: for a universal freedom of movement

    Right to exile: for a universal freedom of movement

    The free movement of persons is a complex freedom.

    Consecrated within national or even transnational communities, it is a freedom whose recognition at the international level remains fragmented and limited, unlike that of goods, which is widely recognised. In addition to the conditions that are traditionally invoked to justify the limits to the exercise of freedom of movement of persons, the foreseeable transformations of our ecosystem (e.g., the development of new technologies, the emergence of new technologies, etc.) are also a factor.
    In addition to the conditions that are classically invoked to justify the limits to the exercise of the freedom of movement of persons, the foreseeable transformations of our ecosystem (explained in particular by the climate emergency) oblige us to disengage personal freedom from the sovereignty of the State, to reformulate its links with the sovereignty of peoples and territories, in order to think differently about the right to exile as a universal freedom and a burning issue of international justice.
    a burning issue of international justice. In order to think about the universality of freedom of movement and to overcome its obstacles, we are pleased to bring together Danièle Lochak,
    Professor emeritus of public law, specialist in exile and the universality of human rights, Alexis Deswaef, vice-president of the FIDH and lawyer specialised in the law of foreigners, Rania Mustafa Ali, Syrian journalist, human rights defender and spokesperson for exiles at the UN, and Julia Montfort, journalist, author of a web series “Carnets de solidarité” informing on the social emergency to which reception and solidarity can respond.

    Event that has already taken place.

    To find out more about the academic lecture cycle.

  • 31.03 17:30
    Centre Malher / University Paris 1 Panthéon Sorbonne
    Thumbnail of Thinking about the rights of the future – reinventing human rights

    Thinking about the rights of the future – reinventing human rights

    Thinking about the rights of the future – reinventing human rights

    “Can the law save humanity, by protecting the climate and eradicating poverty?

    It is with the forcefulness of this question posed by Diane Roman in her latest book (La cause des droits, Ecologie, progrès social et droits humains, Dalloz, 2022) that we open the cycle of conferences in honour of the FIDH’s centenary. While, yesterday, one of the first leaders of the FIDH, René Cassin, defended the Universal Declaration of Human Rights as “the most vigorous, the most necessary protest of humanity against the atrocities and oppressions of which so many millions of human beings have been victims over the centuries”, the climate emergency today, and the upheavals of the ecosystems that it implies, represent a planetary threat but also a challenge for the future of justice and the universality of human rights. The theoretical and practical stakes of these transformations of law and judicial practice will be highlighted through a dialogue between academic analysis, the expertise of the FIDH and the experience of people around the world who think about, fight for and, in the words of Diane Roman, “reinvent human rights”.

    Event that has already taken place.

    For more information on the university lecture series.

  • 12.05 17:30
    University Paris Saclay, Sceaux / Online
    Thumbnail of Climate: A “right to the future” for displaced people?

    Climate: A “right to the future” for displaced people?

    Floods, rising waters, desertification, large-scale pollution, nuclear accidents… there are many reasons why people may be forced to move.

    However, international law does not grant refugee status to people affected by these phenomena. Indeed, the current legal instruments and regimes do not – or do not sufficiently – meet the protection needs of “climate or environmental refugees.”

    How can this shortcoming be remedied? What rights could be recognised in the future for these populations, who are deprived of their territory and everything that goes with it (access to resources, cultural identity, etc.)?

    The lecture proposes to clarify the obstacles imposed by the current system and to draw up perspectives and proposals for a necessary evolution of the legal framework of asylum, a major challenge for the protection of human rights, particularly in the light of the climate emergency.

    See you on 12 May at 5.30pm

    Click here to access the LinkedIn event

  • 20.05 17:30
    University Paris Saclay, Sceaux / Online
    Thumbnail of The future of the universality of human rights and the “cultural argument”

    The future of the universality of human rights and the “cultural argument”

    Is the future of the universality of human rights and the “cultural argument” in danger?

    Belonging to a culture, an ethnic group or a community is often invoked as a criticism of the recognition of the universality of human rights. Far from confining themselves to the argument that cultural identity is a limit to universality, our speakers — academics and human rights defenders — think of the “cultural argument” as a method and a condition for the recognition and guarantee of the universality of human rights.

    – Céline Lageot and J.-J Sueur, professor of public law at the University of Poitiers, CECOJI and professor of public law emeritus at the University of Toulon, directors of a book on L’analyse par cas : une méthode pour le droit comparé des libertés ? LGDJ, 2021

    – Antoine Madelin, advocacy director, FIDH

    – Alice Mogwe, President of FIDH

    – Livia Holden, Director of Research CNRS, Panthéon Sorbonne

    See you on May at 5:30 pm

    Click here to access the LinkedIn event

  • 25.05 17:30
    Université Paris Saclay, Sceaux / Online
    Thumbnail of The future of economic and social rights

    The future of economic and social rights

    Would the universality of economic and social rights be promoted by a reinvention of the institutional framework of its protection? Specialists and experts in the protection of social rights, historians, jurists and FIDH experts will discuss the future of social rights and the transformations of the national, transnational and international institutions that support them.

    – Sandrine Kott, professor of contemporary European history at the University of Geneva

    – Cyril Cosme, France director of the International Labour Organisation

    – Benoît Cosme, lecturer in private law, University of Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines

    – Jimena Reyes, head of FIDH’s Americas desk

    25 May at 5.30 PM

    Click here to access the LinkedIn event

  • 27.06 17:30
    Quartier Jeunes de la ville de Paris, 4 place du Louvre, 75001 Paris / Online
    Thumbnail of Does the right to security have a future?

    Does the right to security have a future?

    Does the right to security have a future? Towards a right to “democratic security”

    Promoted by security doctrines in order to respond to the threats posed to societies by terrorism and pandemics, the right to security, and moreover “the fundamental right to security”, seems to bear ambivalence in law. Such an approach, developed by legislators in a hurry, multiplied or even replicated and “normalised” in a large part of the world’s States, would however undermine the structure and the regimes of human rights protection. Faced with this challenge, which is both a typical and major one in the 21st century, jurists, historians, experts and members of civil society supported by the FIDH question the future of the right to security in democratic societies and respond to the idea of defending a right to “democratic security”.

    Olivier Cahn, Professor of Criminal Law at the University of Cergy

    Hamit Borzarslan, Historian, Director of Studies at EHESS

    Antoine Madelin, Director of Advocacy at the FIDH

    Ilya Nuzov, Head of FIDH Eastern Europe Region

    Natalia Morozova, Lawyer at Memorial, Human Rights Centre (Russia), consultant at the FIDH

    In partnership with the Institute for Public Law Studies (IEDP) and the International Federation for Human Rights (FIDH)

    27 June at 5.30 pm

    Click here to access the LinkedIn event

  • 24.11 17:30
    University Paris Saclay, Sceaux / Online
    Thumbnail of Right to essential goods – the future of the right to development and growth

    Right to essential goods – the future of the right to development and growth

    Distinguish between the universal and the common. Rethinking regimes for the protection of rights to essential goods (public goods, common goods, public services, public property, etc.)
    Does access to essential goods have a future in a context that enshrines the right to development and growth? The diversity of statuses and regimes such as public goods, public property, commons, public services, invites a renewed systematisation of the legal frameworks for the protection of certain goods, material or immaterial, essential services for the full realisation of human rights.

    See you on 24 November at 5.30pm

    Click here to access the LinkedIn event